What does stress look like? How do I know if I am experiencing it?

If you are feeling depressed or generally unhappy; feeling anxious or agitated then you may be experiencing stress.

Signs include people telling you that you are moody or irritable, feeling more angry than usual, isolating yourself and unusual feelings of being overwhelmed and tearful.

Janette Smeeton from Derwent Rural Counselling Service said: “The good news is that there are many healthy ways to relieve the symptoms of stress and you can use more than one of them at the same time.

“Sometimes relieving the symptoms may be enough as the cause of the stress was only temporary.

“We all experience and cope with stress differently, this is affected by our personal levels of resilience and the level of support we have amongst other factors.

“When the cause of the stress is not temporary and cannot be managed by symptom relief alone then you may wish to consider therapy.

“Talking to a therapist can be a key part of addressing and reducing stress in the long-term. A therapist will recommend strategies for dealing with stress and the issues causing it.

“When workplace issues lead to stress, we explore ways to deal with those issues. If an individual is stressed because of family or relationships, couples or family therapy may help resolve the issue – potentially reducing stress for everyone involved.

“We use many types of treatment for stress. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is often effective. CBT can help change negative thought patterns developed because of stress. It is often used to help people find new ways of thinking about events that cause stress.

“Other types of therapy promote mindfulness as a method for reducing stress.

“Conditions like anxiety, PTSD, or addictions are also treatable with therapy. Therapists can help you understand your overall mental health and recommend the best treatment plan for your situation.”

For further information contact DRCS on 0800 047 6861

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